General_Effort

joined 6 months ago
[–] [email protected] 1 points 3 days ago

he more I learn about neural networks, the more they seem like very convoluted statistics

How so?

[–] [email protected] 3 points 3 days ago (5 children)

That's where the almost comes in. Unfortunately, there are many traps for the unwary stochastic parrot.

Training a neural net can be seen as a generalized regression analysis. But that's not where it comes from. Inspiration comes mainly from biology, and also from physics. It's not a result of developing better statistics. Training algorithms, like Backprop, were developed for the purpose. It's not something that the pioneers could look up in a stats textbook. This is why the terminology is different. Where the same terms are used, they don't mean quite the same thing, unfortunately.

Many developments crucial for LLMs have no counterpart in statistics, like fine-tuning, RLHF, or self-attention. Conversely, what you typically want from a regression - such as neatly interpretable parameters with error bars - is conspicuously absent in ANNs.

Any ideas you have formed about LLMs, based on the understanding that they are just statistics, are very likely wrong.

[–] [email protected] -1 points 3 days ago (14 children)

Neural nets, including LLMs, have almost nothing to do with statistics. There are many different methods in Machine Learning. Many of them are applied statistics, but neural nets are not. If you have any ideas about how statistics are at the bottom of LLMs, you are probably thinking about some other ML technique. One that has nothing to do with LLMs.

[–] [email protected] 7 points 3 days ago (1 children)

The noun doesn't matter after an adjective like 'multiple.' Nothing good ever follows 'multiple.'

-Terry Pratchett, Guards! Guards!

[–] [email protected] 33 points 4 days ago (4 children)

The Russian reliance on terror tactics makes me wonder what lessons they took away from WW2. This is clearly part of a pattern; a military doctrine, that had already been applied during the fighting in Syria, if not earlier.

[–] [email protected] 20 points 4 days ago (1 children)

Not like this is the first time. It's not even the second time.

 
[–] [email protected] 1 points 2 weeks ago (1 children)

What are they gonna do, send in a fucking swat team to take anything that doesn’t have hardware level DRM?

In a future where this is established, wouldn't you expect non-compliant hardware to be treated just as drugs or machine guns are treated now?

I think that's hardly an immediate worry, though. Various services already scan for illegal content or suspicious activity. It wouldn't take much to get ISPs to snitch on their customers.

[–] [email protected] 2 points 2 weeks ago (3 children)

It's steady pressure and it's only in one direction. Some countries resist more than others. I'm guessing you are not in the EU, because if so, you'd be aware of the "chat control" push.

Even so, it's not the days of Napster anymore. Think about hardware DRM. It stops no one but you, too, paid to have it developed and built into your devices. Think about Content ID. That's not going away. It's only going to be expanded. That frog will be boiled.

Recently, intellectual property has been reframed as being about "consensual use of data". I think this is proving to be very effective. It's no longer "piracy" or "theft", it's a violation of "consent". The deepfake issue creates a direct link to sexual aggression. One bill in the US, that ostensibly targets deepfakes, would apply to any movie with a sex scene; making sharing it a federal felony.

[–] [email protected] 0 points 2 weeks ago (5 children)

Hey, I'm just saying how it's going. Look at, say, threads here about deepfakes. See all the calls for laws and government action. How can that be enforced?

[–] [email protected] -1 points 2 weeks ago (7 children)

it would be if internet regulation was practically enforceable for anyone other than commercial businesses operating out in the open.

Well, then I guess we just have to call for more government enforcement.

In the EU, there is certainly more government pressure, instead of just lawsuits between big (or small) players.

 

The key problem is that copyright infringement by a private individual is regarded by the court as something so serious that it negates the right to privacy. It’s a sign of the twisted values that copyright has succeeded on imposing on many legal systems. It equates the mere copying of a digital file with serious crimes that merit a prison sentence, an evident absurdity.

This is a good example of how copyright’s continuing obsession with ownership and control of digital material is warping the entire legal system in the EU. What was supposed to be simply a fair way of rewarding creators has resulted in a monstrous system of routine government surveillance carried out on hundreds of millions of innocent people just in case they copy a digital file.

 

cross-posted from: https://lemmy.world/post/16327419

cross-posted from: https://lemmy.world/post/16324188

The Mozilla Builders Accelerator funds and supports impactful projects that are vital to the open source AI ecosystem. Selected projects will receive up to $100,000 in funding and engage in a focused 12-week program.

Applications are now open!

June 3rd, 2024: Applications Open
July 8th, 2024: Early Application Deadline
August 1st, 2024: Final Application Deadline
September 12th, 2024: Accelerator Kick Off
December 5th, 2024: Demo Day
 

cross-posted from: https://lemmy.world/post/16324188

The Mozilla Builders Accelerator funds and supports impactful projects that are vital to the open source AI ecosystem. Selected projects will receive up to $100,000 in funding and engage in a focused 12-week program.

Applications are now open!

June 3rd, 2024: Applications Open
July 8th, 2024: Early Application Deadline
August 1st, 2024: Final Application Deadline
September 12th, 2024: Accelerator Kick Off
December 5th, 2024: Demo Day
 

The Mozilla Builders Accelerator funds and supports impactful projects that are vital to the open source AI ecosystem. Selected projects will receive up to $100,000 in funding and engage in a focused 12-week program.

Applications are now open!

June 3rd, 2024: Applications Open
July 8th, 2024: Early Application Deadline
August 1st, 2024: Final Application Deadline
September 12th, 2024: Accelerator Kick Off
December 5th, 2024: Demo Day
 

The contingent approved via a EuroHPC “Extreme Scale Access” comprises 8.8 million GPU hours on H100 chips and has been available since May.

With the new computing capacities, small models in the range of 7 to 34 billion parameters and large models with up to 180 billion parameters can be trained from scratch.

The new EuroLingua models are based on a training dataset consisting of 45 European languages, dialects and codes, including the 24 official European languages. This gives a significant weight to European languages and values – multilingual large language models are still rare. Training will start at the end of May 2024 and the first joint models are expected to be published in the coming months.

Project leader Dr. Nicolas Flores-Herr, team leader Conversational AI at Fraunhofer IAIS says: “The goal of our collaboration with AI Sweden is to train a family of large language models from scratch that will be published open source.”

 

People with an interest in AI regulation should visit this site. Comments may be left here.

This is different from the NTIA link posted recently.

 

I'm curious where people see Universal Basic Income on the political spectrum. Please mention what national/cultural/generational background is informing your answer. Thanks!

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