[-] [email protected] 23 points 1 hour ago

You mean Brock Turner the rapist who now goes by Allen Turner the rapist? That Brock Turner the rapist?

[-] [email protected] 5 points 2 hours ago* (last edited 1 hour ago)

With classic hits such as:

  • Alone I MoЯn
  • MoЯn on a Leash
  • Coming UnmoЯn
  • MoЯns and Ladders
  • A.D.I.D.A.M. (All Day I Dream About MoЯn)
  • All in the MoЯn
[-] [email protected] 17 points 2 hours ago

Always have been.

[-] [email protected] 4 points 2 hours ago

Einniv Nisouc Ym ?

[-] [email protected] 14 points 3 hours ago* (last edited 2 hours ago)

End child marriage in the U.S.? You might be surprised at who's opposed

No, I really wouldn't be.

[-] [email protected] 3 points 3 hours ago* (last edited 3 hours ago)

And Meta's only concern is whether their check clears.

[-] [email protected] 10 points 3 hours ago

Why just China? I don't trust any "connected" product regardless of country of origin.

[-] [email protected] 1 points 6 hours ago* (last edited 6 hours ago)

3 years seems pretty good for using a car battery outside of it's preferred use case.

Better than that :) They were junk car batteries when I got them, and I still got 3 years out of them. But yeah, they didn't get deep cycled much or at all since there were 2 in parallel and the loads I had on them were very small (5-6 500 mAh cell phone chargers and occasionally some LED rope lights).

When I eventually hooked an inverter up to charge my laptop or run a lamp during power outages, they started to show their age with the extra current draw. I think that's what finally did them in.

Yeah, lithium batteries wouldn't like that kind of daily cycle without some kind of charge/discharge limiter to keep them in the 30-70% range. That's basically what hybrid and EV battery managers do to prolong their useful lifespan. I think LiFePO4 lithium batteries would tolerate that better (they're the ones typically used in e-bikes), but they're not cheap. I've also found it difficult / expensive to find solar chargers for them (to be fair, mine is 48v 20AH so finding any aftermarket charger for it has been a challenge lol).

[-] [email protected] 6 points 6 hours ago* (last edited 6 hours ago)

not because she is vile — because she is a Republican. she has sacrificed her better nature for power and closeness to Trump.

I would argue that's what a vile person would do. She had a choice, and she chose the path of cruelty and hate.

[-] [email protected] 13 points 6 hours ago

What if she's feigning stupidity to enact malice?

[-] [email protected] 6 points 8 hours ago* (last edited 8 hours ago)

Same. Both in getting the same email and not thinking about Reddit at all since then.

I guess I should finally get around to deleting my account. I kept it only because I was afraid my content would be restored if I deleted it during the protests (I edited all my stuff to [deleted] and it seems to have stayed that way).

[-] [email protected] 3 points 8 hours ago

It doesn't exist anymore, but yeah, good call. I never replaced it once the batteries finally gave out, and I moved less than a year later.

It did have vents on the sides for airflow, but that was more of a consideration for heat build up and keeping the controller from cooking in the summer. It was also less a "box" and more like a small doghouse (including shingles lol). I atually gave it to a neighbor after I was done with it; they cut a hole in the door and used it as a cat house.

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submitted 1 day ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

cross-posted from: https://lemmy.world/post/15908405

Training materials produced by the Florida Department of Education direct middle and high school teachers to indoctrinate students in the tenets of Christian nationalism, a right-wing effort to merge Christian and American identities. Thousands of Florida teachers, lured by cash stipends, have attended trainings featuring these materials.

A three-day training course on civic education, conducted throughout Florida in the summer of 2023, included a presentation on the "Influences of the Judeo-Christian Tradition" on the founding of the United States. According to speaker notes accompanying one slide, teachers were told that "Christianity challenged the notion that religion should be subservient to the goals of the state," and the same hierarchy is reflected in America's founding documents. That slide quotes the Bible to assert that "[c]ivil government must be respected, but the state is not God." Teachers were told the same principle is embedded in the Declaration of Independence.

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submitted 4 days ago* (last edited 4 days ago) by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

The researchers did indeed discover a warp drive solution: a method of manipulating space so that travelers can move without accelerating. There is no such thing as a free lunch, however, and the physicality of this warp drive does come with a major caveat: the vessel and passengers can never travel faster than light. Also disappointing: the fact that the researchers behind the new work don't seem to bother with figuring out what configurations of matter would allow the warping to happen.

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submitted 5 days ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

There's no 50's music community to post the original Ritchie Valens version, so here's a 1987 cover.

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submitted 6 days ago* (last edited 6 days ago) by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

Apple and the satellite-based broadband service Starlink each recently took steps to address new research into the potential security and privacy implications of how their services geo-locate devices. Researchers from the University of Maryland say they relied on publicly available data from Apple to track the location of billions of devices globally -- including non-Apple devices like Starlink systems -- and found they could use this data to monitor the destruction of Gaza, as well as the movements and in many cases identities of Russian and Ukrainian troops. At issue is the way that Apple collects and publicly shares information about the precise location of all Wi-Fi access points seen by its devices. Apple collects this location data to give Apple devices a crowdsourced, low-power alternative to constantly requesting global positioning system (GPS) coordinates.

Both Apple and Google operate their own Wi-Fi-based Positioning Systems (WPS) that obtain certain hardware identifiers from all wireless access points that come within range of their mobile devices. Both record the Media Access Control (MAC) address that a Wi-FI access point uses, known as a Basic Service Set Identifier or BSSID. Periodically, Apple and Google mobile devices will forward their locations -- by querying GPS and/or by using cellular towers as landmarks -- along with any nearby BSSIDs. This combination of data allows Apple and Google devices to figure out where they are within a few feet or meters, and it's what allows your mobile phone to continue displaying your planned route even when the device can't get a fix on GPS.

With Google's WPS, a wireless device submits a list of nearby Wi-Fi access point BSSIDs and their signal strengths -- via an application programming interface (API) request to Google -- whose WPS responds with the device's computed position. Google's WPS requires at least two BSSIDs to calculate a device's approximate position. Apple's WPS also accepts a list of nearby BSSIDs, but instead of computing the device's location based off the set of observed access points and their received signal strengths and then reporting that result to the user, Apple's API will return the geolocations of up to 400 hundred more BSSIDs that are nearby the one requested. It then uses approximately eight of those BSSIDs to work out the user's location based on known landmarks.

In essence, Google's WPS computes the user's location and shares it with the device. Apple's WPS gives its devices a large enough amount of data about the location of known access points in the area that the devices can do that estimation on their own. That's according to two researchers at the University of Maryland, who theorized they could use the verbosity of Apple's API to map the movement of individual devices into and out of virtually any defined area of the world. The UMD pair said they spent a month early in their research continuously querying the API, asking it for the location of more than a billion BSSIDs generated at random. They learned that while only about three million of those randomly generated BSSIDs were known to Apple's Wi-Fi geolocation API, Apple also returned an additional 488 million BSSID locations already stored in its WPS from other lookups.>Apple and the satellite-based broadband service Starlink each recently took steps to address new research into the potential security and privacy implications of how their services geo-locate devices. Researchers from the University of Maryland say they relied on publicly available data from Apple to track the location of billions of devices globally — including non-Apple devices like Starlink systems — and found they could use this data to monitor the destruction of Gaza, as well as the movements and in many cases identities of Russian and Ukrainian troops.

"Plotting the locations returned by Apple's WPS between November 2022 and November 2023, Levin and Rye saw they had a near global view of the locations tied to more than two billion Wi-Fi access points," the report adds. "The map showed geolocated access points in nearly every corner of the globe, apart from almost the entirety of China, vast stretches of desert wilderness in central Australia and Africa, and deep in the rainforests of South America."

The researchers wrote: "We observe routers move between cities and countries, potentially representing their owner's relocation or a business transaction between an old and new owner. While there is not necessarily a 1-to-1 relationship between Wi-Fi routers and users, home routers typically only have several. If these users are vulnerable populations, such as those fleeing intimate partner violence or a stalker, their router simply being online can disclose their new location."

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submitted 1 week ago* (last edited 1 week ago) by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

Article if you'd rather read about it.

A common joke is "just launch X into the sun and be done with it". Turns out, that's actually a really difficult thing to do.

From Earth, we would have to accelerate a spacecraft to 33 m/s in the opposite direction of our orbit in order to get it to fall into the sun (without entering an elliptical orbit) For reference, we only need to launch a spacecraft at 11 km/s in the same direction of our orbit to cause the spacecraft to escape our solar system.

This means that it would take less energy to launch a spacecraft to another star than our own sun.

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submitted 1 week ago* (last edited 1 week ago) by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

I'm not sure what triggered this random memory, but I was driving back from a day trip and this song just popped into my head in full clarity.

Over 30 years later, I"m just now realizing Hector is doing some ASL interpretation (which is about the closest to dancing I can do lol).

🎵You gotta believe, reach for the sky. You gotta believe, let your spirit soar high. You gotta believe, let no one stand in your way, and and your dreams will be reality. Some day 🎵

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cross-posted from: https://lemmy.zip/post/15657357

Digital collections put library patrons’ privacy at risk

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submitted 2 weeks ago* (last edited 2 weeks ago) by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

Alt text: A rocket engine attached to a train. The rocket is labeled "AI" and the train labeled "Enshittification train".

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ptz

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